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Horns of a Dilemma

UPDATE

Thanks to @tjluoma for alerting me to this update on the linked piece regarding Amazon’s removal of iOS Kindle access for certain titles. Turns out it was a glitch. Thanks, TJ.

Vertical has just been informed by Amazon that the issue with Knights of Sidonia and the company’s other manga titles on the Kindle App for iOS is due to technical issues. Amazon is working to fix these bugs and have stated the comics should be available again in the near future

Amazon understands how this may inconvenience not only Vertical but our collective costumers, so they took the time to call and explain the situation.

If the problem persists or other issues arise regarding Vertical content on the Kindle please send us an ASK with details and we will look into things.

I’m glad this story has a happy ending and that’s a good response from Amazon customer service. I am still a bit squeamish about Amazon’s handling of the Hatchette contract issues and this whole Amazon Fire Phone thing, but at least I can still (for now) read my purchased ebooks across all of my devices. Whew!


It is becoming painfully apparent that what we saw coming in bits and pieces in the last few years is coming to pass. The services that were low-cost or free are starting to exact their tolls and leaving us with some interesting choices.

The services are wide reaching and nearly ubiquitous. Google, the “don’t be evil” benefactor who provided the internet at our fingertips, is killing off widely used but hard-to-monetize products like Reader and pushing ad-driven social media experiments like Google+. Facebook was never shy about dismissing privacy concerns and made it clear that having a lot of users willingly to give them the intimate facts of their lives for free was their business model. Dropbox has hired Condoleeza Rice, clearly no advocate for protecting my privacy. It is discouraging to say the least.

I have written about my loss of trust where Google is concerned and I’ve taken steps to extricate myself from their influence wherever possible. I have dropped Gmail, use DuckDuckGo for searching the internet, moved my calenders into iCloud and have created anonymous and de-identified accounts to access links from friends (like Youtube).

Facebook was always in my doghouse. I saw it as a worthless timesink at best and a massive privacy violation at worst. I created an “anchor” account there to reserve my name but other than that, I haven’t seen a need to log into Facebook in months, if not years.

Up until now, Amazon has gotten a free pass. They sold us cheap stuff and delivered it quickly to our doorsteps. They did such a great job, we didn’t mind the Amazon Prime price hikes and we quietly seethed at the ridiculous lawsuits they goaded the DoJ into bring against Apple when Apple attempted to break Amazon’s monopolistic strongarming of publishers.

Amazon was still seen as useful despite my misgivings. Free two-day shipping has been such a normal part of the buying process for me that paying extra for shipping and waiting 4-5 days seems like an affront. When iBooks DRM made it difficult for me to move the books I purchased to Marvin which, at the time, was providing a much superior reading experience, I decided to stop buying books from Apple and moved back to Amazon. That changed when I bought a Kindle Paperwhite and was relatively happy with the experience. Bookmark sync was a powerful motivator. I could read for a few minutes on my phone or iPad, confident in the fact that when I returned to my Kindle Paperwhite, the last page I read would be remembered.

Cross-platform was the main driver for my reason to buy my books from Amazon. Being able to swap back and forth between my iPad and my Kindle was a killer feature.

But today, Twitter was buzzing with a story that certain publisher books will no longer be available on the Kindle app – just Amazon’s own Kindle devices. We can’t say for sure what Amazon is likely to do in the future but it has certainly given me pause about buying books on Amazon. Their behavior over the last few months has been thuggish at best and their quest for control has put legitimate, paying customer convenience in the back seat.

I lost trust in Google. I never trusted Facebook. I am losing trust in Dropbox. Now, I can’t trust Amazon. I guess “trust” isn’t the right word here – I never really trusted any of these companies to do anything other than act in their best interests. My mistake was thinking that their best interest was doing what was right for their customers. That’s clearly not the case. Good to know.