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Categories: applewatch

Using It For Exercise Mostly

I’m using it for exercise mostly.

That’s what I’m telling people when they ask me why I needed an Apple Watch. It is as good an answer as most at this early stage. I have this feeling like I am standing at the perimeter of something big but unaware of where the edges are, let alone what shape they might take.

The “notification thing” is really no big deal. The people who said, in early reviews of the Apple Watch, that they are “drowning in notifications” seem like people who don’t understand how technology works. That might sound harsh but I don’t have any other explanation for it. 1 Tuning your notifications is a pretty simple task and the Apple Watch app puts focus on it so if you are “drowning” in notifications, it is your own fault.

If you used to ignore someone you were talking to just to see if your phone has something more important going on, you will likely still do this with your Apple Watch and, yes, you are still an asshole. The watch doesn’t make you less of one and, in some cases, ignoring people while looking at your $600 watch to avoid taking the even-more-expensive phone out of your pocket makes you more of an asshole.

Third party apps are, at this point, almost too slow to bother with. Glances can be very useful but, if you have too many, it adds another layer of frustration as you scroll slowly through each page to get back to the one you want. Keeping your Glances down to the barest minimum is a key to Apple Watch happiness.

Battery life has been a non-issue. I go to bed after a long day with 35-50% battery left and can’t ask for more than that given how much I’m using the watch. That generally includes an hour of exercise in the form of an outdoor bike ride as well.

The actual function as a watch has been great. Even a slight flick of the wrist activates the screen and there are no complaints there. In almost every case, it is akin to magic. I was showing it to an Android Wear person yesterday who nodded in reluctant acceptance that it was, indeed, quite good. He so badly wanted a reason to roll his eyes and sniff in the way Android users do but the Apple Watch didn’t give him the chance. For now he’ll just have to console his despair by side-loading some malware or whatever Android users do for fun.

The landscape the Apple Watch defines right now is wide and its edges unknowable. For those having trouble coming to grips with how to use the watch, my advice is to turn off almost all of the extras for now. Use one or two Glances. Disable all but the most important notifications. Basically, use it as a normal watch. As time goes by, you’ll think “It’d be great if I had {SUPERCOOLTHING} on my watch.” and then you go activate that thing and see if it is as great as you thought it might be. If it is, keep it. If not, turn it off and keep learning.

The more time you spend using the watch the clearer the landscape becomes but there’s so much more it will be able to do as developers come to grips with how to extend its usefulness. However it shapes up, it will always be hard to describe to someone else how the Apple Watch has become useful to you because the things that are providing value sound trivial and inconsequential. But at a personal level, those things are pretty great and despite doubting the point of such a device for months, I have to admit Apple created a device that can do some pretty neat stuff right out of the box and I am even more excited about where this thing is going.


  1. Other than maybe to create a link-bait-worthy controversy which is always possible in the “awesome” world of tech blogging.