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Smaller, Not Larger, Phones

Here’s a good piece by Clark echoing many of the same thoughts I have about the seemingly-inevitable larger iPhone. The gist is that I would prefer a more efficient, smaller iPhone. The thought of a giant, pocket stuffing smartphone is annoying and goes against my goal of minimizing what I carry around every day.

Basically, I want my phone to disappear in my pocket, not fill it.

What I Am Carrying Lately

I have been trying to trim down what I carry around with me for a while now with mixed success. I have trimmed it down as much as I’m willing to and I’m OK with what I currently haul around in my pockets. It isn’t minimal but here it is.

iPhone 5S

I use this thing all the time, obviously. It is one of the greatest inventions ever.

Strider SMF Lego

This is a geniuinely serious folding knife and an amazing one at that. After hearing a lot of opinion back and forth about Strider knives, I eventually decided the only way to know for sure how good these knives are is to buy one and try it out. It has barely left my pocket ever since. There was a break-in period for both the pivot and the lock but it is incredibly smooth now. I have abused this knife and it just shrugs it off. It is a tank. Given how expensive this knife is and its fairly large size, it shouldn’t be at the top of everybody’s list but it is a solid piece of gear and I couldn’t be happier with it.

Keysmart

I hate noisy keys. I bought the Keysmart and now my keys are no longer noisy. Yup.

Atwood Atwrench

This little multitool was what I bought instead of the Gerber Shard and I actually use it a lot, especially the prybar/standard head screwdriver and the little wrench slot. It is quite possible that it is used it to open a bottle of beer now and then.

Fenix LD01 Flashlight

This little flashlight runs off of a single AAA battery and is quite bright. Connecting the Atwrench and the flashlight together with a rubberband further reduces noise.

NiteIze Slide-lock

I like the Slide-lock because I can lock both halves of the carabiner and never have to worry about losing my keychain or my keys. Before the Slide-lock, I had a few circumstances where my keys would get detached from my old carabiner and I got lucky that it was never a disaster.

Fisher Space Pen

This is the smallest, most reliable EDC pen out there. I am not sure why you’d carry something other than this handy little thing. It is awesome.

Field Notes - Pitch Black Edition

Gabe showed me how useful Field Notes could be on a recent trip and I bought a few packs when I got home to try them out. So far they’ve been coming in handy at the weirdest times. I got a few packs of the Field Notes Pitch Black books so I don’t get precious with them; I always tend to do that with Moleskine books given to me as gifts over the years.

My configuration does change now and then. I do have a Bellroy slim wallet that makes it into a front pocket, and I have a large and annoying car keyfob that gets hung on the Slide-lock as well. I try to keep things trimmed down the just the essentials but I use the items above all day long1.


  1. The Strider stays in my bag when I am at my normal job but outside of work, I tend to use it quite a bit. You do have to be sensible where and when to carry a knife, folks! 

Smartwatches I Have Known

When I was a kid, we used to look through the Sears catalog for our Christmas presents. They even called it a “Wish Book” and it worked like a charm. I would dog-ear the pages as flipped back and forth between all of the things I craved and the anticipation was terrible as well as fun. The pictures made the items look so good and it was easy to get swept up in them, ignoring the reality of what they represented.

One day, after reading some vintage Dick Tracy comics, I became fixated on the idea of wrist watch that could do amazing things. It just so happened that, in the Sears catalog, was a “Spy Wristradio” that looked like it would fit the bill. It has knobs and dials and a grill on the face that housed the speaker. I imagined hiding out in spots around the neighborhood picking up interesting radio stations all on my wrist. As Christmas approached I grew more and more excited about the prospect.

Christmas arrived, the presents were unwrapped and there it was. An alarmingly large box with the picture on the side that matched the one in the Sears catalog. I ripped open the package and looked on in horror as the sleek and high tech Dick Tracy wristwatch was replaced with the reality of a large plastic radio mounted on a gargantuan strap. It used four AA batteries and had no antenna to speak of. The power drained quickly as I spent hours listening to static while I turned the knobs patiently looking for any sign of life. I still remember the look on my parent’s faces when we both simultaneously realized that they spent their hard-earned money to buy me this piece of shit and I had been wishing for a Christmas dud all along.

That was my first smartwatch.

Back in 2004, before I contemplated ever owning an Apple product, I was a dyed-in-the-wool Microsoft nerd. I was building computers, playing PC games, running home servers (the hard way), and putting my Windows machines to use for both work and fun. As an unabashed gadget nerd back then, the holy grail was a working computer on my wrist – one that would tell the time as well as give me a full calendar, display upcoming appointments and, importantly, let me know when a critical email hit my inbox.

I already had the latest and greatest handheld device, the Palm Treo, so in reality the watch was redundant but when I saw the Microsoft Fossil at Best Buy, I got a little excited about it. This thing looked like what I expected from a smart device.

I bought one, at a dear cost, and spent the afternoon setting it up. It was a gigantic disappointment. The phone was need to be rebooted often, the battery drained as I watched and would need to be connected to a charging cable often, the communication was carried out via a nascent wireless service called MSN Direct which was still a bit too nascent to actually work. After three days of having to explain the ridiculous thing on my wrist to co-workers, the watch started to rattle and then eventually stopped working altogether. I wrote to Fossil and they sent me an updated model which lasted a few days longer but, by then, I realized that the smartwatch thing wasn’t all it was cracked up to be. It ended up being another device full of imagined promise but delivering none of it.

At this point, I feel as if I’ve learned my lessons on this whole smartwatch thing. Smartwatch technology just isn’t very useful or interesting and I can’t think of a good, life-changing use for it. The Pebble looks like it “works” but delivers information that’s not important enough that I need it at wrist level. Plus it is ugly.

Nothing that can be displayed on my wrist is important enough to get me to wear anything on my wrist. For now, my phone will remain in my pocket and I will check it when I need to know something but every time I see someone wearing a smartwatch, I’ll be sure to ask them the time so they can enjoy a little jolt of superiority staring at the screen of their future piece of garbage.

Horns of a Dilemma

UPDATE

Thanks to @tjluoma for alerting me to this update on the linked piece regarding Amazon’s removal of iOS Kindle access for certain titles. Turns out it was a glitch. Thanks, TJ.

Vertical has just been informed by Amazon that the issue with Knights of Sidonia and the company’s other manga titles on the Kindle App for iOS is due to technical issues. Amazon is working to fix these bugs and have stated the comics should be available again in the near future

Amazon understands how this may inconvenience not only Vertical but our collective costumers, so they took the time to call and explain the situation.

If the problem persists or other issues arise regarding Vertical content on the Kindle please send us an ASK with details and we will look into things.

I’m glad this story has a happy ending and that’s a good response from Amazon customer service. I am still a bit squeamish about Amazon’s handling of the Hatchette contract issues and this whole Amazon Fire Phone thing, but at least I can still (for now) read my purchased ebooks across all of my devices. Whew!


It is becoming painfully apparent that what we saw coming in bits and pieces in the last few years is coming to pass. The services that were low-cost or free are starting to exact their tolls and leaving us with some interesting choices.

The services are wide reaching and nearly ubiquitous. Google, the “don’t be evil” benefactor who provided the internet at our fingertips, is killing off widely used but hard-to-monetize products like Reader and pushing ad-driven social media experiments like Google+. Facebook was never shy about dismissing privacy concerns and made it clear that having a lot of users willingly to give them the intimate facts of their lives for free was their business model. Dropbox has hired Condoleeza Rice, clearly no advocate for protecting my privacy. It is discouraging to say the least.

I have written about my loss of trust where Google is concerned and I’ve taken steps to extricate myself from their influence wherever possible. I have dropped Gmail, use DuckDuckGo for searching the internet, moved my calenders into iCloud and have created anonymous and de-identified accounts to access links from friends (like Youtube).

Facebook was always in my doghouse. I saw it as a worthless timesink at best and a massive privacy violation at worst. I created an “anchor” account there to reserve my name but other than that, I haven’t seen a need to log into Facebook in months, if not years.

Up until now, Amazon has gotten a free pass. They sold us cheap stuff and delivered it quickly to our doorsteps. They did such a great job, we didn’t mind the Amazon Prime price hikes and we quietly seethed at the ridiculous lawsuits they goaded the DoJ into bring against Apple when Apple attempted to break Amazon’s monopolistic strongarming of publishers.

Amazon was still seen as useful despite my misgivings. Free two-day shipping has been such a normal part of the buying process for me that paying extra for shipping and waiting 4-5 days seems like an affront. When iBooks DRM made it difficult for me to move the books I purchased to Marvin which, at the time, was providing a much superior reading experience, I decided to stop buying books from Apple and moved back to Amazon. That changed when I bought a Kindle Paperwhite and was relatively happy with the experience. Bookmark sync was a powerful motivator. I could read for a few minutes on my phone or iPad, confident in the fact that when I returned to my Kindle Paperwhite, the last page I read would be remembered.

Cross-platform was the main driver for my reason to buy my books from Amazon. Being able to swap back and forth between my iPad and my Kindle was a killer feature.

But today, Twitter was buzzing with a story that certain publisher books will no longer be available on the Kindle app – just Amazon’s own Kindle devices. We can’t say for sure what Amazon is likely to do in the future but it has certainly given me pause about buying books on Amazon. Their behavior over the last few months has been thuggish at best and their quest for control has put legitimate, paying customer convenience in the back seat.

I lost trust in Google. I never trusted Facebook. I am losing trust in Dropbox. Now, I can’t trust Amazon. I guess “trust” isn’t the right word here – I never really trusted any of these companies to do anything other than act in their best interests. My mistake was thinking that their best interest was doing what was right for their customers. That’s clearly not the case. Good to know.